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Schedule & Sessions

 

ALL WELCOME: Parents of children with hearing loss, deaf and hard of hearing adults, and the professionals who serve them: Join us February 21st, 2020 from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm at IUPUI. 

CLICK HERE FOR THE FINAL SCHEDULE

 


Featured Presentations - click here


Concurrent Sessions


​Block 1

Development of Word-Learning Skills After Cochlear Implantation: Access to Sound is Just the Beginning
Derek Houston, PhD

Cochlear implants give deaf learners access to sound but provide no information about what those sounds mean. Learning the meaning of spoken words begins with forming associations between the sound patterns of words and the objects, actions, and events that are experienced through all of the senses, especially vision. Accumulating evidence from my lab and others suggests that deaf learners have difficulty learning associations between the sound patterns of words and objects even after cochlear implantation. Moreover, this difficulty is not entirely due to limited speech perception abilities, suggesting that early auditory experience impacts auditory-visual associative learning. I will review factors we have found to contribute to difficulty learning word-object associations and discuss possibilities for improving deaf learners’ spoken word-learning skills after cochlear implantation.


Listening, Spoken Language, and Literacy: Setting the Stage with the Auditory-Verbal Approach
Lyn Robertson, PhD

Children with hearing loss who learn to listen and speak can and do learn to read and write as well as children with typical hearing. It is well-established that having an extensive and secure grasp of the spoken language(s) one will be reading and writing is the foundation for literacy achievement and the academic success that comes with it. This presentation explains why this is so and emphasizes the role of the Auditory-Verbal Approach in enabling a child to build the foundation for literacy.


Pediatric Vestibular Dysfunction and Hearing Loss: More Than a Balancing Act
Kay Bachmann, PhD

Research shows that 30-70% of children born with sensorineural hearing loss also have vestibular loss. The effects of hearing loss on a child’s development are well known, but the effects of vestibular loss are much less spoken about. Dr. Kay Bachmann will discuss the relationship of hearing loss and vestibular loss, as well as the importance of identifying balance dysfunction early. Techniques for assessing balance function in children and approaches to treatment will be discussed and illustrated through case presentations.


Parent Track: Parent-Child Relationships: Ways to Improve Your Communication & Interactions
Ivette Cejas, PhD

Recent studies have highlighted the critical role parents play in facilitating language in children with hearing loss. Specifically, the quality of parent-child interactions, including maternal sensitivity (MS) and facilitative language techniques (FLTs) have been shown to positively affect children’s spoken language (Cruz et al., 2013; Quittner et al., 2013). This session will discuss how parents can interact more positively with their child, while fostering their independence and how this is linked to better language development.

 


Block 2 


Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder In Children: Diagnosis and Management
Patricia Roush, AuD

Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) is a clinical diagnosis characterized by abnormal auditory brainstem responses with evidence of normal outer hair cell function. Children diagnosed with this disorder exhibit a wide range of functional hearing abilities. For audiologists and other professionals, infants with ANSD present special challenges for both diagnosis and management. This presentation will describe the characteristics of children with ANSD and the interdisciplinary approach needed for diagnosis and management.


Executive Function: Why is it Important & How Can You Intervene?
Ivette Cejas, PhD

Executive functioning (EF) is defined as a set of skills that enable individuals to set goals, problem-solve, make and execute a plan, self-monitor, focus attention, remember details and manage time and space. The identified EF deficits in children with hearing loss highlights the need for routine assessment and intervention. This session will discuss how to identify children who have EF difficulties and what strategies and supports can be used to target these areas of weakness.


Playing with Pragmatics and Theory of Mind
Ashley S. Garber, M.S. CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT

Children who are deaf or hard of hearing are at risk for delayed development of pragmatic skills when compared to children who have normal hearing. This session will describe the intersection of social skills, theory of mind and play and delineate specific pragmatic constructs that are of concern. Participants will first evaluate therapy plans that use play as a framework around which to build pragmatic skills and then create templates for future planning.


Parent Track: LSL Every Day in Every Way
Teresa H. Caraway, PhD., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT

Every day is a learning day for your child! In fact, you as their parent are their first and most important teacher. Your child can learn and grow from you using Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) strategies in your everyday routines and activities while wearing their hearing devices during all waking hours. This interactive session will equip and empower you with practical ready-to-use LSL strategies in your daily life to improve your child’s listening, spoken language and literacy skills.

 


Block 3


Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment Options and Guidelines for Clinical Management
Patricia Roush, AuD

Research has consistently shown that children with unilateral hearing loss often experience listening and academic difficulties; however, studies to support treatment recommendations are lacking making it challenging for audiologists tasked with making management recommendations for children and families. This presentation will examine the varied options currently available for treatment along with recently published peer reviewed guidelines.


Five Essential Steps of an Early Intervention Session to Maximize Parent Engagement of Children with Hearing Loss
Teresa H. Caraway, PhD., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT

This lively session will describe and demonstrate five essential steps of an early intervention session to maximize parent participation and engagement. Videotape segments will be used to demonstrate each of the 5 practical steps of an EI session. Participants will learn how each of these steps supports the adult learner and facilitates equipping parents to be their child’s primary teacher as part of their everyday interactions with their child. When a practitioner purposefully structures early intervention sessions to include these 5 key steps, parents are empowered, partnerships are forged, and child outcomes can be maximized.


Development of Word-Learning Skills After Cochlear Implantation: Access to Sound is Just the Beginning
Derek Houston, PhD

Cochlear implants give deaf learners access to sound but provide no information about what those sounds mean. Learning the meaning of spoken words begins with forming associations between the sound patterns of words and the objects, actions, and events that are experienced through all of the senses, especially vision. Accumulating evidence from my lab and others suggests that deaf learners have difficulty learning associations between the sound patterns of words and objects even after cochlear implantation. Moreover, this difficulty is not entirely due to limited speech perception abilities, suggesting that early auditory experience impacts auditory-visual associative learning. I will review factors we have found to contribute to difficulty learning word-object associations and discuss possibilities for improving deaf learners’ spoken word-learning skills after cochlear implantation.


Parent Track: How to Read and Write with Your Child: From Birth Through the Teen Years
Lyn Robertson, PhD

Reading regularly with a child before bedtime is a time-honored practice for good reason; children who have been read with extensively are more likely to become readers and writers themselves than are children without such experience. Children with hearing loss who are learning to listen and speak benefit in multiple ways from participating in shared reading and writing experiences with an adult. This presentation provides guidance and hands-on practice for reading and writing with children from birth through the teen years.